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Book California Series in Public Anthropology: A Passion for Society : How We Think about Human Suffering 35 in MOBI

9780520287235


0520287231
Social inquiry was originally committed to building knowledge and practices to improve the lives of people who experience social suffering. But the approach to the study of society changed: some argued that it should be undertaken for the production of knowledge for its own sake and that its practitioners should operate from a position of moral detachment. Iain Wilkinson, an award-winning sociologists, and Arthur Kleinman, a renowned figure in medical anthropology, provide a critical commentary on how studies of human social life have moved from an original concern with social suffering to dispassionate inquiries. In this deeply considered work, they argue for an engaged social science that connects critical thought with social action and caregiving and that operates with a commitment to establish and sustain humane forms of society. Book jacket., What does human suffering mean for society? And how has this meaning changed from the past to the present? In what ways does the problem of suffering serve to inspire us tocare for others? How does our response to suffering reveal our moral and social conditions? In this trenchant work, Arthur Kleinman a renowned figure in medical anthropology and Iain Wilkinson, an award-winning sociologist, team up to offer some answers to these profound questions."A Passion for Society"investigates the historical development and current state of social science with a focus on how this development has been shaped in response to problems of social suffering. Following a line of criticism offered by key social theorists and cultural commentators who themselves were unhappy with the professionalization of social science, Wilkinson and Kleinman provide a critical commentary on how studies ofsociety have moved from an original concern with social suffering and its amelioration to dispassionate inquiries. The authors demonstrate how social action throughcaring for others is revitalizing and remaking the discipline of social science, and they examine the potential for achieving greater understanding though a moral commitment to the practice of care for others. In this deeply considered work, Wilkinson and Kleinman argue for an engaged social science that connects critical thought with social action, that seeks to learn through caregiving, and that operates with a commitment to establish and sustain humane forms of society.", What is the meaning of human suffering for society? How has this changed through modern times? In what ways does "the problem of suffering" serve as the inspiration for us to act with care for others? How does our response to suffering reveal the moral state of our humanity and our social condition? In this trenchant work, Arthur Kleinman--a renowned figure in medical anthropology--and Iain Wilkinson, an award-winning sociologist, team up to offer some answers to these questions. A Passion for Society investigates the historical development and current condition of social science with a focus brought to how this has been shaped in response to problems of social suffering. Following a line of criticism offered by key social theorists and cultural commentators who themselves were unhappy with the professionalization of social science, it provides a critical commentary on how studies of human social life have moved from an original concern with social suffering and its amelioration to dispassionate inquiries into society for their own sake. It explores the potential for social research to be informed by humanitarian impulse and by care for humanity. The overall aim is to show how social care can be and is being developed in social science as a powerful revitalization and remaking of the discipline. Wilkinson and Kleinman examine the potential for social understanding to be cultivated though a moral commitment to the practice of care. They argue for an engaged social science that connects critical thought with social action, that seeks to learn through caregiving, and that operates with a commitment to establish and sustain humane forms of society., What is the meaning of human suffering for society? How has this meaning changed from the past to the present? In what ways does the problem of suffering serve to inspire us to act with care for others? How does our response to suffering reveal the moral state of our humanity and our social condition? In this trenchant work, Arthur Kleinman a renowned figure in medical anthropology and Iain Wilkinson, an award-winning sociologist, team up to offer some answers to these profound questions.A Passion for Society investigates the historical development and current condition of social science with a focus on how this development has been shaped in response to problems of social suffering. Following a line of criticism offered by key social theorists and cultural commentators who themselves were unhappy with the professionalization of social science, Wilkinson and Kleinman provide a critical commentary on how studies of human social life have moved from an original concern with social suffering and its amelioration to dispassionate inquiries. The authors demonstrate how social care is revitalizing and remaking the discipline of social science, and they examine the potential for achieving social understanding though a moral commitment to the practice of care. In this deeply considered work, Wilkinson and Kleinman argue for an engaged social science that connects critical thought with social action, that seeks to learn through caregiving, and that operates with a commitment to establish and sustain humane forms of society."

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