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The Path to War : How the First World War Created Modern America by Michael S. Neiberg download MOBI, DJV, TXT

9780190464967
English

0190464968
America's entry into World War One in April 1917 marked the end of one era in the nation's history and the start of another. As acclaimed historian Michael S. Neiberg reveals in his compelling new work, the Great War erupted in the midst of lively domestic debate as to what America's role should be in the global sphere. Whereas Woodrow Wilson was re-elected in 1916 by pledging to stay out of the conflict in Europe, former president Theodore Roosevelt was convinced that the war offered a means for the U.S. to become a dominant power and ensure national security. In The Road Over There, Neiberg follows American reactions to such events as the Lusitania, German espionage, and the Zimmermann telegram, shedding light on the dilemmas and crises that the country faced in the war years. In the summer of 1916, German agents detonated the Black Tom railroad terminal in Jersey City, New Jersey, leaving only fragments of piers (still visible today); it was the costliest act of domestic terrorism in American history before 9/11 and its effect was galvanizing. Neiberg's book will revive debates around America's entry into World War One, building to Wilson's declaration while examining the forces and shifts that made it all but inevitable. Neiberg establishes beyond question that World War One was not a parenthetical exception in American history but a moment of national and international self-identification, one whose effects still resonate today., On April 2, 1917, the United States declared war against Germany, entering the war that for years had tearing Europe apart. This moment marked the end of one era in the nation's history and the start of another. World War One erupted in the midst of lively domestic debate as to what America's role should be in the global sphere. Whereas Woodrow Wilson was re-elected in 1916 by pledging to stay out of the conflict in Europe, former president Theodore Roosevelt was convinced that it offered the means for the U.S. to take its rightful place as a world power and ensure national security. The nation spent three years, at a crossroads, and then chose its path. In The Path to War, Michael S. Neiberg argues that World War One was the defining event of the twentieth century for the United States. He follows American reactions to such events as the Lusitania, German espionage, and the Zimmermann telegram, shedding light on the dilemmas and crises the country faced in the war years. The choice to join the carnage situated America within global politics and prompted George M. Cohan in 1917 to compose "Over There," one of the most popular and enduring songs of the 20th century. A single year of war had crucial effects on the country's identity; "hyphenated Americans" or otherwise, all citizens united to contribute to the effort. The Path to War revives debates around America's entry into World War One, building to Wilson's declaration while examining the forces that made it all but inevitable. Neiberg establishes beyond question that the war was not a parenthetical exception in American history but a moment of national and international self-identification, one whose effects still resonate today., When war broke out in Europe in August of 1914, it seemed, to observers in the United States, the height of madness. The Old World and its empires were tearing each other apart, and while most Americans blamed the Germans, pitied the Belgians, and felt kinship with the Allies, they wanted no part in the carnage. Two years into war President Woodrow Wilson won re-election by pledging to keep out of the conflict. Yet by the spring of 1917-by which point millions had been killed for little apparent gain or purpose-the fervor to head "Over There" swept the country. America wanted in. The Path to War shows us how that happened. Entry into the war resulted from lengthy debate and soul-searching about national identity, as so-called "hyphenated citizens" of Irish and German heritage wrestled with what it meant to be American. Many hoped to keep to the moral high ground, condemning German aggression while withholding from the Allies active support, offering to mediate between the belligerents while keeping clear. Others, including the immensely popular former president Theodore Roosevelt, were convinced that war offered the country the only way to assume its rightful place in world affairs. Neiberg follows American reaction to such events as the sinking of the Lusitania, German terrorism, and the incriminating Zimmermann telegram, shedding light on the dilemmas and crises the country faced as it moved from ambivalence to belligerence. As we approach the centenary of the war, the effects of the pivot from peace to war still resonate, as Michael Neiberg's compelling book makes clear. The war transformed the United States into a financial powerhouse and global player, despite the reassertion of isolationism in the years that followed. Examining the social, political, and financial forces at work as well as the role of public opinion and popular culture, The Path to War offers both a compelling narrative and the inescapable conclusion that World War One was no parenthetical exception in the American story but a moment of national self-determination.

The Path to War : How the First World War Created Modern America by Michael S. Neiberg download EPUB, DOC

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